10 reasons you should try spring camping

Close your eyes and imagine:

  • your face flush with your first dose of spring sunshine
  • your ears are filled with the beautiful songs of migrating birds
  • your nervous system soothed by the rhythm of waves on the shoreline

Sounds wonderful, doesn’t it?

Here are our top ten reasons to try spring camping this season:
Continue reading 10 reasons you should try spring camping

Happy National Pet Day from Ontario Barks

In today’s post, the Chairdog of the Ontario Barks committee shows off his best buds at their favourite provincial parks with their humans! 

Oh boy! It’s National Pet Day! *zoomies*

Even though this is a special day, I’m going to be fur-real with you – in my household, every day is pet day.

From the endless array of squeaky toys (with yummy stuffing and no eyes), the long W-A-L-Ks filled with my smelly presents, and second dinners because the human thought I didn’t get fed by the other human – it’s a pawesome time.

And get this: the fun doesn’t stop here. Sometimes, the human packs a bag and we head on out to a provincial park (there are hundreds!) for an adventure!

Don’t believe me? I’ve gathered all the evidence below of my best buds enjoying park visits! (Don’t ask about who destroyed the couch though; there is no proof.)

Continue reading Happy National Pet Day from Ontario Barks

Waldeinsamkeit: solitude in the forest

Picture this: you’re alone, deep into a forested trail. Your only companions are the birds fluttering from branch to branch around you. As you walk, you follow a corridor made of pillars of ancient trees, and smell the earthy aroma of moss and damp leaves.

How do you feel? It’s hard to describe, but the words which immediately come to mind are calm, peaceful, and contemplative. You feel a deep-rooted connection to the world around you, and you are reminded of the importance of our natural environment.

There’s a word for that feeling: waldeinsamkeit.

Continue reading Waldeinsamkeit: solitude in the forest

How to be a Bear Wise visitor

Black Bears live across Ontario in forested areas where they can find enough food, shelter, and denning sites. Our provincial parks are their home, and over 90% of our parks are in bear country.

A safe bear sighting during one of your adventures with Ontario Parks can be a lasting memory. Educating yourself about bears before your visit is important and the mark of a responsible park visitor.

We want to share space with bears, keeping our human visitors and all our wildlife residents safe.

If you’re planning a visit, here are some important safety tips about Black Bears:

Continue reading How to be a Bear Wise visitor

Meet Quetico Provincial Park’s new camping pods

Looking to try a different style of camping at Quetico Provincial Park?

Perhaps you’re craving a step up from tent camping or longing to try an entirely different style of Ontario Parks’ roofed accommodation units.

Well then, let us introduce you to Quetico’s camping pods and let the glamping begin!

Continue reading Meet Quetico Provincial Park’s new camping pods

Destination Temagami

Surrounded by shining waters and cloaked in towering pines, Finlayson Point Provincial Park lies just south of the Village of Temagami.

Sharing a shoreline with the Lake Temagami Skyline Preserve, a protected ring of pine forest that surrounds the lake, Finlayson Point provides visitors with access to Temagami — a treasured part of Ontario that many travellers see only a glimpse of as they head north or south along the highway.

Continue reading Destination Temagami

Winter adventures at Rushing River Provincial Park

Today’s post comes from Isabella Schives, senior park clerk at Rushing River Provincial Park.

Now that the seasons have changed and snow blankets the ground, the natural beauty of this vibrant and popular summertime park takes on an incredible transformation.

Icicles begin hanging from trees and buildings, fresh snow crunches underneath your feet, and the brisk, cold air provides a refreshing feeling with every breath.

Each step takes you further away from the hustle and bustle of everyday life as you relax into the tranquility and peace of wintertime at Rushing River Provincial Park.

Continue reading Winter adventures at Rushing River Provincial Park

Your winter preparedness guide

If you’re reading this, you’re likely a human being with a core body temperature around 37ºC.

Your body works very hard to maintain this temperature. If it drops even a few degrees, moving, thinking, and other basic tasks become difficult. You will need to warm up quickly, or you may find yourself in a dangerous situation.

To prevent cold-related emergencies, it’s important to plan your winter adventures with care.

Our friends at Subaru Canada want to share the best ways to stay safe in cold weather:

Continue reading Your winter preparedness guide