The transformative power of nature at Killbear

This post comes from Kaitlyn-Lee Mun, one of our wonderful summer students at Killbear Provincial Park.

“I’m going to Killbear for the summer.”

“Cool…where’s that?”

This was the response I was usually met with when telling my family and friends where I was going for the summer.

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How to keep your brain healthy this summer

Summer is without a doubt the best time to get outside and play. There’s so much to do like hiking, cycling, or paddling.

It is also the perfect time to take charge of our brain health. We often hear that being active is great for our heart and muscles, but let’s not forget what it can do for our brain. Exercise helps protect our brain cells and encourages the growth of new ones by boosting levels of growth factors called neurotrophins.

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Connecting new Canadians to the outdoors with NatureLink

At Ontario Parks, we believe that nature is for everybody.

In honour of Healthy Parks Healthy People, we wanted to create opportunities for new audiences to experience the amazing natural spaces in Ontario.

That’s why we partnered with Parkbus to offer two NatureLink programs on this year’s free day (July 20, 2018). Here is the story of how two groups of new Canadians got to experience Ontario Parks for the very first time.

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Get outside with ActiveDays

This blog post comes from Walker Kitchens, coordinator of the ActiveDays program. 

Are you taking the 30×30 Challenge this August? Need a way to get your nature time in?

In honour of the challenge, Parkbus is offering three ActiveDays throughout the month of August to get you moving in the outdoors.

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Keep your child’s asthma under control this summer

Summer’s here, bringing with it camping getaways, family hikes, and playing outdoors all day long. But if your child suffers from asthma, keeping it under control during the summer months is necessary to ensure they have a safe and active break from school.

Planning ahead and taking precautions helps to reduce their risks. Beware of summer asthma triggers such as pets, food allergens, campfire smoke, air pollution, mould in the forest, and dust and mould in tent or trailer. Remember that air quality on vacation not be as easy to monitor as it can be at home.

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Healthy Parks Healthy People Day 2018: events

The countdown is on: enjoy FREE day-use at all Ontario Parks on July 20, 2018.

Parks across the province have a variety of events and activities planned to help you reconnect with nature. Explore a new park, participate in a family adventure, or simply take a moment to enjoy the view. Most importantly: get outside and get active!

Check out our four spotlight events, or scroll down to see park events from across the province:

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Is your favourite park making you sneeze?

For those who suffer from asthma or allergies, the warmer weather and park visits can sometimes mean running nose, watery eyes or breathing difficulties.

It’s time for a quick pollen lesson to better equip you to take control of your breathing.

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Do your kids suffer from Nature Deficit Disorder?

Have we got the cure for that!

Richard Louv, author of Last Child in the Woods: Saving our children from Nature Deficit Disorder, rocked the parenting world with his notion that outdoor play is becoming extinct and we as parents are to blame.

His theory is that children nowadays are so overprotected and sedentary they have developed what he calls Nature Deficit Disorder, a condition that renders children devoid of outdoor play, disconnected from nature and completely unaware that their very future – and ours as a species – is at risk.

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